How Likely Is A Driver to Commit a Moving Violation?

Driver safety is always a top priority of any vehicle operator. When the Department of Transportation commissioned a major university to conduct research on driver data, they compiled a comprehensive report of many different factors that affect driver safety. Much risk stems from the lifestyle of drivers and their subsequent conditions of physical health. In fact, their health is a great precursor to how they’re likely to perform on the road as a driver.


One topic the study pursued was that of moving violations. In their research, [https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/49620] they sought risk factors, by association, of drivers and the incidence of moving violations. Here are some of their findings. 


1. Age. Age plays a big factor in the risk of a driver committing moving violations. The older a driver is, it seems, the less likely they are to receive a moving violation. Each yearly increase in driver age reduced the likelihood of a moving violation conviction by 6 percent.


2. Weight. A driver’s body weight or Each unit increase in body mass index (BMI) reduced the likelihood of a moving violation conviction by 1.2 percent. It’s unclear why this is, but it the greater their weight, relative to their height, meant a slightly greater risk to them receiving a moving violation.

 

3. Medical Certification. Attaining a shorter-term medical certification, increased a driver’s risk of a moving violation. Drivers who obtained a periodic medical certification were 45.1 percent more likely of being convicted of a moving violation, compared to drivers who obtained a full 2-year medical certification.


4. Illness and Injury. Those who had been injured or sick, were less likely to receive a moving violation. Drivers who reported an injury or illness in the last 5 years were 26.9 percent less likely to be convicted of a moving violation compared to drivers who reported no injury or illness in the last 5 years. 


5. Alcohol and Tobacco Use. A history of alcohol abuse and tobacco use are significantly more at risk of attaining a moving violation. Drivers with treated alcohol use were 34.78 times more likely to be convicted of a moving violation compared to drivers who did not have alcohol use. Drivers with untreated tobacco use were 33.1 percent less likely to be convicted of a moving violation compared to drivers with no tobacco use. 


6. Diabetes. Diabetic or pre-diabetic drivers - are significantly more at risk of committing a moving violation. Drivers with treated diabetes and elevated blood sugar were 38.7 percent more likely to be convicted of a moving violation compared to drivers who did not have diabetes or elevated blood sugar.


7. Blood Pressure. Blood pressure is a big deal for truck driving. Drivers who have high blood pressure that is untreated, have significantly greater risk of attaining a moving violation - by a significant margin. Drivers with untreated high blood pressure were 65.2 percent more likely to be convicted of a moving violation compared to drivers who did not have high blood pressure. However, drivers with treated high blood pressure were 18.7 percent less likely to be convicted of a moving violation.  Drivers with potential high blood pressure were 34 percent more likely to be convicted of a moving violation compared to drivers who did not have high blood pressure.


8. Lung or Chest Condition. Those with a lung or chest condition were more at risk of moving violations - by a wide margin. Drivers with a potential lung and chest condition were 3.95 times more likely to be convicted of a moving violation compared to drivers who did not have a lung and chest condition.


9. Limbs. Drivers with a missing or impaired limb were significantly more at risk of moving violations. Drivers with a treated missing and impaired limb were 15.96 times more likely to be convicted of a moving violation compared to drivers without a missing/impaired limb.


10. Sleep. Drivers with treated sleep apnea were 36.6 percent less likely to have a moving violation conviction compared to drivers who did not have sleep apnea. But drivers with a treated other sleep disorder are still at risk and were 3.05 times more likely to be convicted of a moving violation compared to drivers who did not have a sleep disorder.

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